Classic Album of the Week: Siouxsie and the Banshees-Juju

1978’s “The Scream” saw an insane amount of potential in the punky-groove realm with barren drum grooves and simple, quirky guitar loops complementing a huge lead singer with shocking make-up and a wild melodic sense.  A new icon was born, but outside the UK, she wouldn’t be influential for a while.

Considering the rise of bands today like Ought, Preoccupations, and Priests; the rap love of post-punk from Danny Brown and Vince Staples; and the even more direct influence of Slowdive—a band named after a Siouxsie Sue tune—it’s clear that the movement had a huge impact and the Banshees were an integral part of post-punk’s aura.

Looking back on their career, they were consistent.  They released albums yearly after their debut, each time adding a bit more practice onto their foundation and even exploring some electronics on the insanely ahead of its time track “Red Light.”

As a whole, I would say the band is more influential and iconic than their albums and Siouxsie Sue would be a figure of goth, new-wave, and post-punk based on a handful of tracks, covers, and her ridiculously good stage-presence rather than having a universally-loved “Illmatic,” but to this day 1981’s “Juju” remains a measured, consistent post-punk masterpiece that set the tone for a decade.

Budgie’s cavernous drums and John McGeoch’s layered guitar work are the first big things that stick out when considering the band’s sonic development.  “Spellbound” finds a driving groove with a combination of jangling guitar strumming and anticipatory guitar arpeggiation.

The drums stick out a bit more on “Into the Night” where traditional Banshees circular tom patterns meet a new-found depth.  “Voodoo Dolly,” the seven-minute jam that closes out the album, sees distant, screams of guitar noise and pounding drums giving new life to Sue’s strained chorus.

Sue keeps a bit of her old self.  With an infectious-as-hell “trick or treat, the bitter and the sweet” chorus, “Halloween” is the same blunt lyricism that made tracks like “Carcass” so loveable, but there’s also some slightly more developed dark imagery that would influence the many goth-bands to come.  “Night Shift,” for instance, opens with sparse bass lines, before a chugging demeanor sets in.  Singing about the “Night Shift sisters” (prostitutes), Sue pains a rather dire picture: “The cold marble slab submits at my feet/With a neat dissection/Looking so sweet to me.”

Siouxsie Sue was an icon for a lot of people.  In terms of album delivery, “Juju” saw her at her best and it remains her band’s most rewarding statement to date.

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